Data Privacy Law and DPO Services

We help clients in a variety of sectors including Financial Services, Digital Advertising, Media, and Healthcare.

Practice Areas

DPO Outsourcing Services

A Data Protection Officer is the lead authority on data security, GDPR compliance, and liaising with government agencies, both in the US and the EU. We provide clients the necessary skills, expertise, and relationships they need by combining the responsiveness of an internal DPO and the perspective of an outside counsel.

GDPR Compliance

Many businesses are not familiar with the requirements of the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which applies to any business processing EU citizen data in any way.  The GDPR imposes strict penalties for failure to comply, but we help clients implement “data security by design.”

Federal and State Regulatory Investigations

Regulatory agencies, such as the FTC or the NY Department of Financial Services, oversee privacy and data security in the US.  Our familiarity with these agencies and the law allows us to craft compliance policies and establish best practices that anticipate, rather than merely respond, to agency expectations and demands.

Data Breach Planning and Response

No one wants to be the subject of a data breach, but even the most secure companies can still be at risk.  The most important step is the one you take before the breach occurs — creating an incident response protocol and planning for the worst.  We create breach response and compliance protocols so that our clients always have a plan.

Litigation

There has been an explosive growth in data-related litigation in the last ten years, with no signs of slowing.  Our deep experience in litigation allows us to seamlessly move from trusted advisor to zealous advocate, whether as a plaintiff or in defense. We can manage a case from inception through appeal, and tirelessly advocate for our clients’ rights.

Corporate Governance

Compliance requires more than lip service to protecting information.  Boards have affirmative obligations to engage meaningfully with data regulations and privacy law, or they risk regulatory or shareholder lawsuits.  We advise boards on how to make data security a component of their duties, and how to make their company smarter about data.

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Latest Updates

When you think about it, facial recognition is a deeply “human” action.  It’s the most common way for people to recognize one another, it’s one of the earliest stages of our developmental attachment to our parents, and it is, by far, the easiest way to evaluate someone’s credibility, intentions, and personality.  It explains why we… Read More

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The Internet is a risky place for “expertise.”  Because it is both a platform and a megaphone, it creates its own multiplier effect for whatever you put into it.  If the arguments of the last few years have proven anything, it’s that even a poorly concocted lie spreads far faster than a well-explained truth, largely… Read More

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One recent trend that makes privacy professionals very nervous is the “what’s my DNA say about me” fad.  You swab your cheek, mail it off to a lab, and presto: you learn that you’re 99% Irish/Scottish and 1% Pacific Islander with a high chance of getting appendicitis.  Obviously, unlocking the mysteries of our ancestry is… Read More

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We spend an enormous amount of time talking about the benefits of data partnerships but, of course, they aren’t without their risks.  No one enters into a business relationship assuming that everything will go exactly as planned (without serious problems later, anyway).  But how do you identify ways to protect your business, your data, and… Read More

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If we’ve had this happen once, it’s happened several dozen times.  We’ll be discussing our book, or our practice, or how we approach privacy issues, and someone will say something like “Yes, well, you know, data is the new x.”  And x can be anything.  Oil, money, gold, papayas, whatever. The analogy is, essentially, that… Read More

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The Internet went into full “give me a Drudge Report siren” mode last week about Facebook’s announcement that it anticipates a fine of three to five billion dollars from the FTC in the coming months.  The fine, a result of Facebook’s violation of a 2011 consent decree with the Commission related to privacy practices, tracking,… Read More

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Contact us to learn more about data privacy and strategy.

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